SG News (Straits Times)

Coronavirus: Australian football body slashes staff temporarily, other sports also suffering as shutdown bites

By April 5, 2020 No Comments
Football Federation Australia Chief Executive Officer James Johnson speaks to the media during a press conference in Sydney, Australia, on March 24, 2020.

Football Federation Australia Chief Executive Officer James Johnson speaks to the media during a press conference in Sydney, Australia, on March 24, 2020.

SYDNEY (AFP) – Football Federation Australia sent home 70 per cent of its staff on Friday (March 27) in a bid to survive the coronavirus pandemic, as other sports were locked in crisis talks on how best to weather the storm.

Despite holding out to be one of the last competitions in the world still playing, the plug was finally pulled on the A-League this week with soccer countrywide now at a standstill.

FFA chief executive James Johnson said the shutdown would inevitably hit revenue streams hard, including national registration fees, broadcast money, sponsorship, and ticket sales.

“So we have needed to adjust our operations to ensure that we can remain operational, forcing us to take the unfortunate decision to stand down approximately 70 per cent of our workforce,” he said.

FFA employs around 100 people and while some were switched to part-time, others are going on paid leave when possible and “a number of staff members” were forced to take time off without pay.

There was no mention of players taking pay cuts.

Football is not Australia’s most popular spectator sport, but more than two million people play the game and Johnson insisted that it was only a “temporary stoppage”.

“We need a strong national governing body in place and a team ready and able to get back to work as soon as possible, as football will play an essential role in the recovery of our nation post Covid-19,” he added.

While football was closing in on the end of its season, rugby league and Aussie Rules had just started theirs, and the financial fallout is likely to be worse.

 
 

National Rugby League bosses had previously said it would be “catastrophic” to suspend the season and they have been huddled in talks this week with the Rugby League Players’ Association to work out how to share the burden.

Reports have said the game’s 480 contracted players, some earning in excess of A$1 million (S$870,250) a season, were facing 50 per cent pay cuts.

Another suggestion, according to the Sydney Morning Herald, would see all players receiving a basic stipend of less than A$10,000 per month for the next three months in a bid to ensure those most financially vulnerable are not left behind.

Australian Rules Football (AFL), Australia’s biggest spectator sport, is in similar crisis talks with savage cost-cutting already under way at most clubs and hundreds of staff temporarily suspended or let go.

 
 

Rugby Australia, the union code’s governing body, already facing tough financial times after a lacklustre season by the Wallabies and a hefty payout to sacked player Israel Folau, is set to unveil its cost-savings next week.

With no live content to supply broadcast partners, television payments are set to stop and job losses and pay cuts appear inevitable.

 
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